Yale has seen socio-economic mobility as a central pillar of its mission since its earliest days
— Peter Salovey, President of Yale College

A.L.E. is dedicated to Working alongside our incredible university to MOBILIZe TALENTED LOWER-INCOME STUDENTS AT YALE, BOTH OVER THE COURSE OF THEIR FRESHMAN YEAR AND BEYOND.

Yale College President Peter Salovey chats with students (Photo by Michael Marsland)

Yale has a long and well-established record of making world-class education an affordable option for all prospective students and their families. Our university was one of the first in the country to adopt a need-blind admission policy; at Yale, an applicant's financial status is not considered until after admission.
 

Such a policy requires an extraordinary commitment, as Yale's financial aid department must be prepared to extend aid to each and every admitted student requiring financial assistance. Dedicated to meeting 100% of demonstrated family need, our financial aid department works to ensure that families earning below $65,000 per year do not have to contribute financially to their child's education [1].

Upwards of 53% of Yale's student body receives some form of financial aid, with the average annual award per recipient totaling more than $43,000 [2]. As a result, 84% of students in the Class of 2014 were able to graduate debt-free [2].

In recent years, Yale has taken large-scale, actionable steps towards making our university even more accessible and affordable to all students. Of the over 1,800 students who comprise the incoming Class of 2019, 18.5% qualify for Federal Pell Grants – a 43% increase over the past two years [2]A Leg Even was founded by a group of college students who wanted to do their part in helping their University accomplish the incredible goal outlined above: to ensure lower-income students full access to the University and everything it has to offer academically, extracurricularly and professionally. Our goal is to work alongside our University in combating the unique challenges inherent in the college experiences of lower-income students across America.